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welshbookworm

The Welsh Bookworm

The Welsh Bookworm is a librarian living and working in rural Minnesota. She is a past-president of the St. David’s Society of Minnesota, leads the Welsh folk-dance group Traed Y Ddraig, and teaches Welsh language classes. Her Welsh Bookworm column was featured occasionally in the newspaper Y Drych, now part of Ninnau. Laurel works for the Carver County Public Libraries in Waconia and Norwood Young America, loves reading, music, dance, languages, genealogy, gardening, and bird watching. Laurel reads historical fiction, mysteries, sci fi/fantasy, medieval and British history, Arthurian fiction, classics, and of course, anything connected to Wales. Follow my blog at http://welshbookworm.wordpress.com

Currently reading

Mrs. Queen Takes the Train
William Kuhn
The Boleyn Deceit
Laura Andersen
Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life - Barbara Kingsolver, Steven L. Hopp, Camille Kingsolver, Richard A. Houser If anyone can make talking about growing and eating your own food for one year interesting, it's Barbara Kingsolver. I do enjoy her writing and her sense of humor. But this book really could have been shorter. Living in Minnesota doesn't lend itself to the kind of extreme locavore habits that Kingsolver espouses without some serious austerity measures in the winter. Nor do I have the kind of stay at home time for all the canning, cooking, cheese-making, etc. Vegetarians be warned that Kingsolver goes into considerable detail about raising animals for food. I did enjoy her stories of turkey mating, though, and found myself cheering on one particularly plucky girl through all of her trials and tribulations, and waiting and hoping with anxious breath for the first egg to hatch.

Description:
Hang on for the ride: with characteristic poetry and pluck, Barbara Kingsolver and her family sweep readers along on their journey away from the industrial-food pipeline to a rural life in which they vow to buy only food raised in their own neighborhood, grow it themselves, or learn to live without it. Their good-humored search yields surprising discoveries about turkey sex life and overly zealous zucchini plants, en route to a food culture that's better for the neighborhood and also better on the table.

Part memoir, part journalistic investigation, Animal, Vegetable, Miracle makes a passionate case for putting the kitchen back at the center of family life, and diversified farms at the center of the American diet.